During the last weeks I saw a few reviews (like this one) about long time experience with the Surface Go. I have mine for a couple of months now and finally finished the first semester where it accompanied me for a couple of different tasks. I planned to use my Surface Go to take notes during the lectures to not waste paper or get too distracted using my laptop. That didn’t really work out, because the professor of two of my courses disallowed the use of tablets and computers in the lectures (or at least set high restrictions that weren’t really worth it for me) and I had to write on paper instead.
Going to the cemetery always reminds me what a precious gift life is and how grateful I am to be alive and that I am also doing so well.
Tinify or TinyPNG or TinyJPEG is the service I use to automatically compress and resize images uploaded to my micropub media endpoint. It’s a great service with a nice developer API that also offers a free limit of 500 compressions per month and has a pay-what-you-use policy after that (but I won’t upload more than 500 images per month anyway). I use a library written in Go to use the API.

I’m visiting the site of Purelymail from time to time for over a year now (shortly after they launched), because I’m interested into how the service evolves. It looks like a great service that provides purely mail and is very cheap or even cheaper when you are opting for advanced pricing (“Pay as you go”). You can add as many custom domains and users as you want and just pay for the resources you actually use.

Unfortunately, they are still in beta and not yet “GDPR compatible” (I didn’t find anything about an option to sign a DPA). I would also like to read some feedback from existing users.

I don’t show webmention content at all. 😅 Instead I just show a link to the “interaction”. That removes a lot of complexity with parsing, storing etc. but probably isn’t as intuitive: it requires opening the “interactions” section below the post and visiting the link.

On a lot of IndieWeb sites, I noticed that profile images of webmentions get directly embedded from their original source. For example, Twitter profile images are loaded directly from Twitter servers (pbs.twimg.com) or even my profile image is directly embedded from my site. However you should consider enabling Content Security Policy (CSP) headers and only allow embedded content from trusted sites (your own domains). It could always happen that a site gets hacked and malware injected or a domain expires and some spammers register it again, that will also affect your website’s visitors.

Thanks to @hacdias, I just discovered this:

curl wttr.in

But wttr.in can’t only show you your current weather and the forecast (based on your IP location) in your terminal, it also has a lot of extra options and is open source. Check out the GitHub repository.

wttr.in is a console-oriented weather forecast service that supports various information representation methods like terminal-oriented ANSI-sequences for console HTTP clients (curl, httpie, or wget), HTML for web browsers, or PNG for graphical viewers.

Although it’s great to self-host your web fonts instead of using a service like Google Fonts (that may decrease the privacy of your site’s visitors, because Google can log IP addresses and other stuff), it’s probably not necessary to use web fonts at all. Every PC or tablet or phone has a lot of fonts already pre-installed, which are more than perfect for displaying your website (unless you take a lot of care about corporate design or your personal brand and require a specific font).
After talking to @jlelse, I finally decided not to trouble myself with writing my own static website generator and just improve what I have right now. Optimizing software to run faster is a good thing in itself. If you have to wait less for the software to run, you have more time for other things. But if you invest hours or days to save a few seconds in the end, then I question if this is a good idea.
Jan-Lukas Else
20 years old student who writes about everything he cares about.