jlelse's Blog

Thoughts, stories and ideas

in Micro
Reply to: My History With Blogging

I haven’t been blogging as long as you, Kev, but almost 10 years ago, right at the beginning of secondary school, I had my first experience with websites. 2 or 3 years later I started blogging. In 2017 I have written about my blogging history until then (in German in the third person). I think it will be time soon to write about my blogging history again.

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My own Static Site Generator

in Thoughts

Because I don’t have enough side projects yet, I started programming my own static site generator, with the creative name GoBlog. I doubt it will replace my use of Hugo in the near future, but it is exciting to write a Go program that is designed for high speed. I get to know features that I have never used before. I also learn what to pay attention to when thousands of files have to be parsed and processed concurrently.

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How I curate links for my blog

in Posts

On my blog there is a section called “Links” (recently not only in English but also in German). But how do I find links that I find interesting and worth sharing? In this post I will describe my process. What I like to read most are blogs of other people. I don’t know many of them at all, at least not personally, but met them by chance sometime in the internet.

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Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2020

in Links

The result of the Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2020 has been published and as every year it is quite interesting to take a look at it. But it is also important to note that the survey was conducted in February, before some countries went into lockdown. It is interesting to see that Go developers get a much higher average salary than Java developers. Is it perhaps also an advantage in terms of my career that I have been getting more involved with Go lately and that it is my favourite language for my private projects?

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"sans-serif" only

in Dev

I used to use system fonts for my blog theme, but I rethought this decision and converted to the following font-family in my CSS: font-family: sans-serif; Right, that’s just sans-serif. This should choose the default sans serif font, which is configurable in most browsers. By choosing sans-serif only, I give the reader the option to decide for themselves which font to choose. If I use the system fonts, I ignore the user’s preferences and force a specific font on them, which they may not have set as default for good reasons.

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The Shapes of Code

in Links

It is interesting to look at code not only from the content aspect, but also from the appearance. The appearance of code can give hints how to refactor it. Beyond the mere visual aspect of code, the shape of a piece of code can carry information by itself. Being able to decipher this information allows to glean indications about the code at a glance, even before starting to read it.

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It's about time you try Linux

in Links

“It’s about time you try Linux.” is a nice little site listing a few Linux distribution options for beginners (and also more advanced users) and explaining why you should try Linux. I use Linux less because it’s open source and free software (although that’s a bonus point too), but more because I thinks it’s more user friendly. Installation is fast and simple, updates don’t take ages, I don’t need to crawl the web to find software installers, it isn’t full of bloatware, it runs great on most (even older) hardware etc.

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Self-hosted server(less) functions

in Thoughts

One thing which I have never looked more closely at, but which I think is very interesting, are “Serverless Functions”, although they are not so serverless because they run on a server. Whatever. On Hacker News, I found a GitHub repository and an article about it. With fassd, it’s easy (and possible without Kubernetes) to install a runtime for serverless functions on a single server. Sort of like Lambda from Amazon, but open source and self-hosted.

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Bringing back the 90s Internet

in Links

There was a discussion on Hacker News the other day about whether blogs are dead or not. I think that there are still many blogs, more than you could ever read. (You can find some of them in my blogroll.) What is different today is that blogs are harder to find. Sure, sometimes when you search for something specific on Google, you find blogs too, but most blogs are more likely to be found via links or aggregators (Hacker News, Lobste.

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in Micro

Yesterday evening I hinted that I will give my blog a new design in the next days. I woke up relatively early today and thought that I could just finish it quickly now. My goals were on the one hand to simplify the design significantly, but on the other hand to save as much HTML and CSS as possible. Now the page should load even faster than it did before. Almost every page on this blog (except the ones with images) uses less than 10 KB for transfer.

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Jan-Lukas Else