Dev

Hugo is a framework to build static websites. Yesterday I migrated this blog from Ghost - a dynamic NodeJS based CMS - to Hugo, not only to reduce the hardware requirements (a static page uses way less resources), but also to simplify my setup. I already use Hugo for two basic homepages (my personal one and the AndroidPub one), where I don’t have that many requirements regarding “blogging”, because I don’t use them for blogs.

Back to Ubuntu

Ubuntu was the first Linux Distro I “really” used. Before that I sometimes used Knoppix to disable some time limits on my PC my parents set me (but that’s another thing). I used Ubuntu to revive some old PCs I got from school, including my first laptop. Ubuntu is the distro most people start their Linux journey with, wether it’s on the desktop or a server. But I’m always a specialist in trying to customize my system too much and somehow destroying it along the way.
Containers are wonderful and Docker is a really awesome and lifesaving technology, even if you don’t host sites and services with millions of users that need to auto-scale etc. Docker can already simplify a simple hosting setup just with a couple of small webpages and a Git server. Some months ago I switched my whole setup to use only Docker. I used Ubuntu server because that was the best option at my hosting provider.
I used Pagekit for quite some time with my personal homepage. Pagekit gave me a nice Admin UI and there were also nice themes and plugins, which I could use. But Pagekit is PHP and the setup isn’t that optimal. So I switched back to a static site setup with Hugo. Some years ago I used Jekyll to build a lot of websites. Jekyll was really easy to use and you could host your sites on GitHub for free, I didn’t rent a server yet back then.
I’m a Solus user (and enthusiast), but as one I also faced a common problem. Not every desktop app is available on Solus Linux and you also can’t run .deb or .rpm installation files, because Solus uses a different package manager and isn’t based on any other Linux distribution. But my study required me to install an application called “Inform 7”. This software is available for Ubuntu, Debian and also Fedora.