Influence

I’ve been noticing this more and more lately. Often, when I blog about something, like yesterday about a software I discovered, there are actually people who take a closer look at the thing I blogged about, in the case of the software even install it and try it out. I actually seem to have some influence on my readers and somehow it fascinates me. Especially when I think that I wondered a few months ago if anyone was reading my posts at all.
I started my fediverse journey with Mastodon, the most popular fediverse / ActivityPub software out there. First I joined a public instance, then I temporarily hosted my own instance, forgot about the fediverse, joined again on a public instance some months later and eventually settled with my own Pleroma instance, which is now running for almost a year. But why shouldn’t I take a look at other options too? Some months ago, I briefly tried Microblog.

I just did updates on my home cloud, and among those updates was a new version of bitwarden_rs. Bitwarden is a quite popular open source password management solution. I use it for quite some time already. Until some months ago, I used the hosted version, for which I even paid a few bucks to get premium features and support the developer behind the project.

But Bitwarden is open source and it’s possible to host your own Bitwarden server instance, which you can than use with the mobile apps, browser extensions and other client implementations. Unfortunately the official server implementation requires Microsoft SQL and needs many resources.

Thankfully there’s an alternative implementation of the server implementation written in Rust, which is very lightweight: bitwarden_rs. It can run without problems on a Raspberry Pi.

Using Docker it’s really easy to setup and you have access to all features, including those for which you would have to pay for at the hosted version.

I just updated my laptop (a Lenovo ThinkPad S1 Yoga) from Ubuntu 19.04 to the new Ubuntu 19.10 (beta). The last time I did a fresh install was one year ago, when I installed Ubuntu 18.10. The whole upgrade process went through within less than 30 minutes, to which I also count re-enabling disabled PPAs (they get disabled to prevent the system from breaking), removing old and obsolete packages and disabling snapd, which got automatically installed, because the native Chromium package in Ubuntu got replaced with the Chromium snap app.

GitHub projects focused on climate change

In the past years I always took part at the Hacktoberfest organized by GitHub and DigitalOcean. The rules are simple, do four (I think in the past it was five) pull-requests to any public projects on GitHub and you’ll receive a free t-shirt and some stickers.

This year however, I lack the time to take part too and because I wore the last t-shirts not often enough, I don’t need another one that’s shipping around the world just to use up more space in my closet.

I took a look at the website though, to see what projects are featured there. I was amazed when I saw a section with projects focused on climate change.

There’s also a “topic” on GitHub featuring more projects. Definitely worth taking a look. And if you need a t-shirt and have some time left, maybe contribute to those projects.

One of the projects is the app “Sh**t! I Smoke”. Although I don’t smoke it seems like I’m a passive smoker by just breathing.