Docker

One of the most visited pages on my blog is about how to automatically backup Docker volumes. In that post I use the Docker image blacklabelops/volumerize. Unfortunately that image is deprecated since March 2019 and not longer maintained. Under the hood the volumerize image is using the GNU program duplicity, which is an awesome software, but also has its downsides. Especially the model of full backups and incremental backups comes from a time where backups where mainly made to tapes (just append new files all the time).
A few weeks ago PostgreSQL 11 was released with a few new features and probably also a lot of improvements and bug fixes since the last release. Although I don't really have the need to update to the latest version (I just use PostgreSQL as database for my Nextcloud and Miniflux installations), I wanted to migrate it though, to have everything up to date and probably profit from those smaller improvements.
Update I changed my setup because the Docker image used in this post got deprecated and is no longer maintained. Read about my new setup using restic to automatically backup Docker volumes. 👉 New setup Original post For my server needs, I rent a small VPS at Hetzner Cloud. It has two vCPUs, 4 GB of RAM, 40 GB of storage and I can use 20 TB of outgoing traffic each month (the incoming traffic is free and unlimited) and it only costs me 5,83€ each month, a lot cheaper than DigitalOcean, Linode or even AWS.
Hugo is a framework to build static websites. Yesterday I migrated this blog from Ghost - a dynamic NodeJS based CMS - to Hugo, not only to reduce the hardware requirements (a static page uses way less resources), but also to simplify my setup. I already use Hugo for two basic homepages (my personal one and the AndroidPub one), where I don't have that many requirements regarding “blogging”, because I don't use them for blogs.
Containers are wonderful and Docker is a really awesome and lifesaving technology, even if you don't host sites and services with millions of users that need to auto-scale etc. Docker can already simplify a simple hosting setup just with a couple of small webpages and a Git server. Some months ago I switched my whole setup to use only Docker. I used Ubuntu server because that was the best option at my hosting provider.
I used Pagekit for quite some time with my personal homepage. Pagekit gave me a nice Admin UI and there were also nice themes and plugins, which I could use. But Pagekit is PHP and the setup isn't that optimal. So I switched back to a static site setup with Hugo. Some years ago I used Jekyll to build a lot of websites. Jekyll was really easy to use and you could host your sites on GitHub for free, I didn't rent a server yet back then.
I'm a Solus user (and enthusiast), but as one I also faced a common problem. Not every desktop app is available on Solus Linux and you also can't run .deb or .rpm installation files, because Solus uses a different package manager and isn't based on any other Linux distribution. But my study required me to install an application called “Inform 7”. This software is available for Ubuntu, Debian and also Fedora.
Many people use Google Chrome, because they like it's fancy syncing feature. You know, open a tab on your PC and just continue on your phone. Or because of the nice built-in password manager. Just save that damn password and it's securely stored in your Google account and available everywhere. But what about privacy? You can forget it when you use Chrome. You have no privacy there. Google can read all of your browser history, passwords and bookmarks.
It is not uncommon for me to jump back and forth between software. Be it with Linux distributions (Solus is my current favorite), blogging engines (Ghost for most of my sites) or the software I use to run my server. Up to now, I have always done it this way, that I installed the individual programs I have (like Ghost for a blog) directly in the server system (Ubuntu 16.04 LTS).
Jan-Lukas Else
20 years old student who writes about everything he cares about.