Hugo

If this post is published on my blog, I successfully developed a nice piece of software that allows me to publish from wherever I go to my blog using just a web browser. Even from my smartphone! How this works? Just a small spoiler before I write a more extensive article: It’s a form on a page of my blog and some client-side JavaScript that transforms the entries of that form and calls the Gitea API to create a new file.

Added JSON Feed to this blog

Today I updated my blog setup to the new Hugo version 0.59, which includes nothing big, but several small improvements. In addition to that I finally added support for JSON Feed to this blog. JSON Feed is popular among IndieWeb folks and my feed reader Miniflux supports it too. Unfortunately it isn’t yet supported natively by Hugo, so I needed to manually add it using a custom output format. I took a lot of inspiration from Jamie Tanna and his Hugo theme, as well as the tutorial from Arjen Schwarz.
Although I use Hugo heavily for this blog and all my other websites for more than a year already, I discover new (old) features from time to time. About new features I’m often informed, because I read the changelog whenever a new version gets published1, but there are still a lot of features that appeared before I started using Hugo. A few days ago, I discovered “related content” and implemented it into my theme right away2.
Yesterday, I added support to my Hugo theme to use it to reply to other posts on the web using the u-in-reply-to class (here’s the documentation for h-entry) and sending a webmention after publishing the post. Now I can use my blog to comment on other IndieWeb-compatible sites, how cool is that? 😄 Some sites automatically display received webmentions, but I currently don’t plan to do so. However, I receive webmentions and see them in my feed reader.

SCSS adventures

I’m currently in the process of improving my sites Hugo theme. I removed features I never used and simplified unorganized HTML and CSS, to enable adding new features (like better support for IndieWeb things) later. My theme was once based on the Hugo theme Mainroad, but I modified so much over the time that almost nothing is left from the original theme. The theme, which was a port of a WordPress theme called “MH Magazine”, supported Internet Explorer 11, but when I discovered CSS variables, I made use of them and broke Internet Explorer support on the way.