Linux

Support for Windows 7 ended yesterday. Now you have to pay for future security patches. Therefore it would be advisable to stop using this operating system version and look for another alternative. A common suggestion is to switch to Linux and I agree that you should do so if you are not dependent on any Windows-exclusive programs and there are no alternatives to them. But there are also reasons to continue using Windows (but please version 10).

BleepingComputer reports, that Google is blocking some Linux browsers (Konqueror, Falkon and Qutebrowser) from logging into it’s services, “because they may not be secure.”

In tests conducted by BleepingComputer, we can confirm that we were unable to log in with Konqueror or Falkon on multiple machines. When attempting to do so, we were told to try a different browser as Konqueror or Falkon may not be secure.

According to Google the reasons are, that the browsers…

  • Don’t support JavaScript or have Javascript turned off.
  • Have unsecure or unsupported extensions added.
  • Use automation testing frameworks.
  • Are embedded in a different application.

On the one hand, I find that this is unacceptable and Google is once again trying to play out its monopoly, on the other hand, it would be advisable to avoid not only the Chrome browser, but Google services in general.

Some time ago, I put together a list of Google alternatives.

Today I started sorting out a couple of old computers from the flat. To save the data from those, I took the hard drives, connected them via adapters to my PC and cloned each partition to a huge external hard drive. Now I have a bunch of NTFS partition image files. One also with Windows 2000. 😅 This post is more of a note to myself, to remember how to mount them on Linux (TIL).
In my previous post about the operating systems I use, I wrote: And although it uses the Gnome desktop, it has some custom modifications I would like to deactivate (since I started using Fedora Silverblue, I got to love the stock Gnome desktop). I didn’t know (and I honestly didn’t searched for solutions before), but it’s possible to use Vanilla GNOME with Wayland on Ubuntu. It’s just a matter of one command:
I use at least eight different operating systems on a daily basis. Windows 10 on my Microsoft Surface Go Ubuntu Desktop on my latpop (Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga S1) Fedora Silverblue on my desktop PC Android on my smartphone (Xiaomi Mi A1) Tizen on my smartwatch (Samsung Galaxy Watch) Ubuntu Server on my mail server (Hetzner VPS) RancherOS on my main server (Hetzner VPS) Armbian on my home server (Odroid HC 2) That sounds like a lot and it’s probably a lot.
If you want to use Linux applications on Windows you have multiple options. Using the Windows version of the application if it’s available, cross-compile the app, use a VM or Docker, or use the Windows Subsystem for Linux with a X Server. A small and lightweight WSL distro is Alpine, which is also quite popular in the Docker world. It’s based on musl, uses busybox and just contains the most important things to be functional.
I just updated my laptop (a Lenovo ThinkPad S1 Yoga) from Ubuntu 19.04 to the new Ubuntu 19.10 (beta). The last time I did a fresh install was one year ago, when I installed Ubuntu 18.10. The whole upgrade process went through within less than 30 minutes, to which I also count re-enabling disabled PPAs (they get disabled to prevent the system from breaking), removing old and obsolete packages and disabling snapd, which got automatically installed, because the native Chromium package in Ubuntu got replaced with the Chromium snap app.

Using Windows

The new semester in university started again and I’m using Windows for university things now. Yes, excuse me, I said Windows. I’m using it on my new Microsoft Surface Go. I try to find a workflow that works best on Windows. In Windows some things need to be done differently, but I think so far I’m ok with it and get used to it. Just a few days ago, I found out about Chocolatey.
It’s probably not that easy to understand, why I (as a strong Linux advocate) bought a Microsoft Surface Go and use Windows on it, but let me try to explain… In about one week the new semester at university begins and I thought about how to take notes during lectures. The last years I often used my normal laptop (a ThinkPad Yoga S1, a convertible, running Linux) but was very distracted sometimes.
This is just a quick post, I mainly write for myself, in case it should happen to me again. I temporarily broke my Fedora Silverblue installation for the second time by running the command: sudo rpm-ostree ex livefs --i-like-danger after I installed a new package. One has to append --i-like-danger for a reason, but I didn’t want to hear. I wanted to try the new package directly without rebooting my PC.
Jan-Lukas Else
20 years old student who writes about everything he cares about.