jlelse's Blog

Thoughts, stories and ideas

Open Source

Handle HTML forms through email with MailyGo

in πŸ”— Links

It’s nice to see when people fork, modify and actually use your open source projects. Like Emanuel Pina does. He has forked my project MailyGo, which enables receiving form submissions on static sites and sends them via e-mail. He added some nice features (which I will definitely take inspiration from and add some back to the upstream project!). By looking at his code I also found out that Scaleway has a managed container registry service, which might be a viable alternative to Quay.

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TinyPilot

in πŸ”— Links

Michael Lynch is someone who, when he has an idea or a problem, spares no effort to get to the bottom of it and develop a solution, usually with a combination of hardware and software. Recently he developed a project that allows him to remote control a server just by connecting a Raspberry Pi via USB and HDMI. The Pi runs a program with a web interface that forwards the keyboard input to the server via USB and sends the HDMI output back to the browser.

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A successful day

in πŸ’­ Thoughts

Today (or already yesterday at the time of publication of this article) was a quite successful day. πŸ’ͺ I managed to convert my girlfriend to a Firefox and Bitwarden user. Since her computer was acting crazy and marked all downloaded files as viruses, we not only removed the McAfee antivirus program and activated Windows Defender instead, but also installed Firefox (even with uBlock Origin!). Now she can finally download and view PDF files again without any problems.

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Principles or convenience?

in πŸ’­ Thoughts

Actually, I’m more of a fan of free, libre and open source software. So if possible I prefer to use Libre Office instead of Microsoft Office. But now, for two presentations for university, I tried Google Presentation. And what can I say? It’s actually not the bad. It is very easy to use. The suggestions, similar to those in PowerPoint, are very good for giving slides an attractive design. And also the slide master editor is somehow easier to use than I remember from Libre Office.

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Friends must be free to choose whatever software and service they want

This rant is great! Dear so-called “social” websites. Your catchword is “share”, but you don’t want us to share. You want to keep us within your walled gardens. That’s why you’ve been removing RSS links from webpages, hiding them deep on your website, or removed feeds entirely, replacing it with crippled or demented proprietary API. FUCK YOU. […] Friends must be free to choose whatever software and service they want.

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Some thoughts about LibreOffice vs. Microsoft Office

in πŸ’­ Thoughts

I usually prefer using LibreOffice over Microsoft Office because it’s free / libre software and I can use it on Linux. However, while writing a seminar paper, I noticed one feature that LibreOffice Writer is missing and that made me use Microsoft Word for the paper: literature index. I need to make references following the IEEE style. While it’s pretty easy to create a literature index and select whether it should be IEEE style, APA or one of the many other styles, literature indexes in LibreOffice are a pain.

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GitLab Telemetry: Use Non-Commercial Alternatives Instead

Yesterday, GitLab sent an email to all users (and wrote a blog post) telling that they are updating their terms & services (to which you have to agree) to include a new third party service to track and analyze the behavior of their users, so that they better understand how their users interact with GitLab. That understandably created a lot of backlash from users who don’t want to get tracked. Sure, GitLab needs a way to see which features get used in which way, but it’s probably not necessary to use a third party service to accomplish this task.

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distro.tools: Scripts for lazy Linux users

Today I want to share one of my own projects: distro.tools. distro.tools is a small but growing collection of scripts to manage your Linux distribution. Currently most of the scripts are made to install the latest versions of specific software on your computer, but it’s planned to include scripts for all different kind of needs. Some time ago (actually many months ago), I found myself trying to automate the setup of my laptop, in case I need to reinstall everything.

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VSCodium: Microsoft-free Visual Studio Code binaries

in πŸ’­ Thoughts

Visual Studio Code is an awesome text editor. It is in fact my favorite one. I use it for writing blog posts, I use it for looking at code (although I prefer JetBrains IDEs for actual coding) and I use it whenever I need a text editor. What I really like is the plugin system. There are plugins for almost everything and you also get recommended addons for the file you currently look at (probably based on the filetype).

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Did you ditch Chrome yet? Don't switch to Brave though.

in ✍️ Posts

There is some discussion recently about another evil move by Google. Google plans to deprecate (and remove) an API in it’s webbrowser Chrome, that is used by many ad-blocking addons. Of course they are ignoring voices from the community! Only enterprise customers will be able to use this API for custom development. Is it a surprise at all, that Google wants to do that? Google (Alphabet) is one of the biggest (ad) companies.

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Jan-Lukas Else