Open Source

Today I want to share one of my own projects: distro.tools. distro.tools is a small but growing collection of scripts to manage your Linux distribution. Currently most of the scripts are made to install the latest versions of specific software on your computer, but it’s planned to include scripts for all different kind of needs. Some time ago (actually many months ago), I found myself trying to automate the setup of my laptop, in case I need to reinstall everything.
Visual Studio Code is an awesome text editor. It is in fact my favorite one. I use it for writing blog posts, I use it for looking at code (although I prefer JetBrains IDEs for actual coding) and I use it whenever I need a text editor. What I really like is the plugin system. There are plugins for almost everything and you also get recommended addons for the file you currently look at (probably based on the filetype).
There is some discussion recently about another evil move by Google. Google plans to deprecate (and remove) an API in it’s webbrowser Chrome, that is used by many ad-blocking addons. Of course they are ignoring voices from the community! Only enterprise customers will be able to use this API for custom development. Is it a surprise at all, that Google wants to do that? Google (Alphabet) is one of the biggest (ad) companies.
I recently wrote a blog about how to schedule posts on Netlify using IFTTT. IFTTT is a proprietary service from a company that somehow has to make money (They earn money by charging other services that want to make their service available to the IFTTT platform). However because of this business model, IFTTT is limited to services that have and are willing to pay the money to get on the platform.
It is not uncommon for me to jump back and forth between software. Be it with Linux distributions (Solus is my current favorite), blogging engines (Ghost for most of my sites) or the software I use to run my server. Up to now, I have always done it this way, that I installed the individual programs I have (like Ghost for a blog) directly in the server system (Ubuntu 16.