jlelse's Blog

Thoughts, stories and ideas

Tags: Programming


My new coding workflow: VS Code + Remote-SSH extension

Published on in 👨‍💻 Dev

I recently rediscovered the ability of Visual Studio Code to develop on remote machines. Just connect to a server via SSH and develop there.

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Music programming

Published on in 💭 Thoughts

It sometimes happens that I fall down a rabbit hole. Suddenly a subject catches my attention and excites me very much. The latest topic where this is the case is the software Sonic Pi and making music by code, basically “music programming”. I played the recorder for many years, but I do not have a real feeling for beat and rhythm. I like to listen to music, especially electronic music, but I couldn’t make music myself, I would miss the musical feeling.

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My own Static Site Generator

Published on in 💭 Thoughts

Because I don’t have enough side projects yet, I started programming my own static site generator, with the creative name GoBlog. I doubt it will replace my use of Hugo in the near future, but it is exciting to write a Go program that is designed for high speed. I get to know features that I have never used before. I also learn what to pay attention to when thousands of files have to be parsed and processed concurrently. Maybe I will never be able to use this project for anything useful, but side projects are mainly there to have fun or learn something useful.

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The Shapes of Code

Published on in 🔗 Links

It is interesting to look at code not only from the content aspect, but also from the appearance. The appearance of code can give hints how to refactor it.

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Published on in 💬 Micro
Reply to: A note by Beko Pharm

regex101.com is my favorite tool for testing and debugging regular expressions too. It can even generate code. 🤓 Very nice tool! 👍

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Published on in 💬 Micro

I admit it is the first time I am writing code that is almost 100% covered by unit tests. But it’s such a good feeling to have small, concise methods whose functionality you can rely on. Even before I have a running application, I know that what is already written will work. And unit testing with Go is really fun.

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Coding

Published on in 💭 Thoughts

When I write code, it often serves the purpose it is supposed to serve. However, it is often not the most elegant. Especially when I compare my code with other implementations, I sometimes find mine somewhat ugly. I think I’m thinking too chaotic, start writing the code immediately and while I’m writing it, I think of things I could do differently and in the end it’s a big mess. Maybe I should first sketch my code on paper and then type it into the computer without thinking much about it? Or are these just feelings of inferiority and my code is not so bad after all?

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Go and Java

Published on in 💭 Thoughts
Updated on

While I need to use Java for university projects (currently that are one Spring and one Java EE project) and work, I use Go on some personal projects (Hugo backend and KISSS). While I’m getting more familiar with Go (I do Java for many years), I also experience cases where I actually miss language features from Java. Oh and it’s not generics, I’m currently (still) fine without generics.

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Published on in 💬 Micro

Codecademy was once a great source to learn new programming languages, but it seems in the last year, they started to push harder to increase revenue. After login you get presented a page to buy Pro access (and you need to find that small “Back” link), Pro banners everywhere and popular courses like the one to learn Python 3 are Pro-only anymore. Seems like I need to find another source to learn some Python basics for my seminar paper about Falcon.

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The Value in Go's Simplicity

Published on in 🔗 Links

Benjaming Congdon shares in an article, why he appreciates Go’s simplicity. To summarize: Its great forward / backward compatibility, dependencies (stable, fewer dependencies needed), included functionality (testing, http, …) and formatting (because Go has an integrated formatter, although every project has its own way to do things, all code follows the same formatting conventions).

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