RSS

It seems like there’s a new trend popping up: Newsletters and paid newsletters. I prefer to read content using a news reader, with which I can subscribe to countless RSS (or JSON) feeds. I can also decide when to consume new content and am not bothered with reminders etc. that there is new content available. Full freedom on my side. Newsletters however popup in your email inbox and create pressure. The newsletter stays in your inbox, always reminding you, you haven’t looked at it yet.

According to this article by John Naughton on The Guardian, the first serious blog, Dave Winer’s blog Scripting News1, was born 25 years ago.

I want to highlight two things from this article (but you should read the whole article, everything not highlighted is interesting too):

1. Blogging doesn’t need monetization. Although I didn’t sell a company to Symantec, like Dave Winer did, I blog without showing ads on my site. I’m blogging to share my voice:

And despite its wide readership, it has never run ads. This may be partly because Dave doesn’t need the money […] but it’s mainly because he didn’t want to compete for the attention of his readers.

2. It’s nice that the Guardian recommends using RSS readers:

The blogosphere continues to be one of our greatest information resources. So why not log off social media, get yourself an RSS reader and wise up?


  1. I never heard of his blog before, to be honest. And the shaky train, I sit in, and the bad WiFi in this train don’t allow me inspect it further at the moment. It also seems to load somewhat slow and doesn’t have https. 🤔 [return]
I never thought being featured in a website that hits the Hacker News frontpage, results in so many pageviews. Thanks for sharing my blog, Kev! Kev Quirk mentioned my blog and especially my blogroll in his article “Please Add RSS Support To Your Site” (on Hacker News), where he asks blog owners to please provide an RSS feed. I already blogged, that RSS is still alive and it’s actually an integral part of the open web.

Too much news?

I’m currently on vacation and spend less time than usual on things like news and blog articles. A result of this is my news reader is collecting more and more news articles, but too many to read them all. I am currently subscribed to around 75 news feeds (blogs, but news sites too), and every now and then I go through the list of all new articles and save those that seem to be interesting.

Google Alternatives for More Privacy and Less Monopoly

I hope I don’t have to explain why Google is bad, but just to give a few reasons to switch to alternatives: You’ll probably get better privacy because those alternatives collect less data about you, your data won’t get sold to advertisers or government organizations that easily and you help to prevent a monopoly. Sometimes alternatives are also just better than the Google product and don’t lock you in so much.

RSS is still alive

I just found this article from Gizmodo about RSS while going through the list of new items in my feed reader (Miniflux) because it was on the front page of Hacker News, to which I subscribed using RSS. The article says that RSS is a better alternative to consuming news through social media (especially Twitter). I really agree with this. Since I consume my news primarily via RSS, I can avoid click-bait much better and don’t spend useless hours reading uninteresting articles.
20 years old student who writes about everything he cares about.