Tips

I just did updates on my home cloud, and among those updates was a new version of bitwarden_rs. Bitwarden is a quite popular open source password management solution. I use it for quite some time already. Until some months ago, I used the hosted version, for which I even paid a few bucks to get premium features and support the developer behind the project.

But Bitwarden is open source and it's possible to host your own Bitwarden server instance, which you can than use with the mobile apps, browser extensions and other client implementations. Unfortunately the official server implementation requires Microsoft SQL and needs many resources.

Thankfully there's an alternative implementation of the server implementation written in Rust, which is very lightweight: bitwarden_rs. It can run without problems on a Raspberry Pi.

Using Docker it's really easy to setup and you have access to all features, including those for which you would have to pay for at the hosted version.

I hope I don't have to explain why Google is bad, but just to give a few reasons to switch to alternatives: You'll probably get better privacy because those alternatives collect less data about you, your data won't get sold to advertisers or government organizations that easily and you help to prevent a monopoly. Sometimes alternatives are also just better than the Google product and don't lock you in so much.

Journaling with rwtxt

For about a month now, I do journaling again. Every evening before I go to bed, I try to write down everything that comes to my mind. I usually write what I have done that day, what my emotions where and other things that I thought about during the day. It has a very positive effect to do that. I wrote about that more detailed on my German blog (Google's translation).
There might be some people who only use the Git command line interface. But I'm definitely not one of them. I'm way to lazy to always type all the commands. When I'm working on something in VSCodium, I use the integrated Git support, same goes for IntelliJ IDEA. They are great for simple things like staging files and committing them. For me it would be even less productive to open a terminal and type all those commands.
This is a really bad title, but summarizes what I regularly do and recommend doing regularly. A nice side effect of using a password manager is, that it gives you a perfect overview about all your accounts. From time to time I go through this list (at the moment I have saved over 200 logins) and see if there are any services I no longer use and need. If this is the case I go to the website, log in and try to find the settings to delete that account.
You may ask yourself, how secure is the email provider you use or the mail server you operate yourself. Today I learned that there is a simple way to test this. A test platform provided by the European Commission provides a simple way to test security standards of your mail provider or mail server, that just involves receiving a mail and responding to it. It also checks some DNS settings and finally calculates scores in these three categories:
Yesterday I found a nice article with the title “Into the Personal-Website-Verse” (I really recommend to read it - or listen to it) but which is quite long. My reading speed isn't that fast and it was late and I was tired but wanted to know the content of this blog article. A great way to solve this problem is to not read the article yourself but let somehow read it to you.
I recently wrote a blog about how to schedule posts on Netlify using IFTTT. IFTTT is a proprietary service from a company that somehow has to make money (They earn money by charging other services that want to make their service available to the IFTTT platform). However because of this business model, IFTTT is limited to services that have and are willing to pay the money to get on the platform.
I already wrote about that you should think about paying for your email service (or host it yourself if you're crazy), but another important aspect is the email address itself. Many people (and I also did this in the past) use an email address given by their provider like an address with @gmail.com, @outlook.com or any other. Using such an address is free of course, but it is definitely some kind of lock-in.
Yesterday, I wrote about Delta Chat and Chat over IMAP. To be able to chat using email, you need an account at an email provider. Many people use Gmail, with over 1.5 billion users it's probably the biggest email provider out there, people already joke, Google owns email. But email at it's core is decentralized. You can use whatever provider you like and still communicate with the rest of the world.
Jan-Lukas Else
20 years old student who writes about everything he cares about.