Tutorial

In this series I want to share my experiences of using Windows on a private device again. If you want to use Linux applications on Windows you have multiple options. Using the Windows version of the application if it's available, cross-compile the app, use a VM or Docker, or use the Windows Subsystem for Linux with a X Server. A small and lightweight WSL distro is Alpine, which is also quite popular in the Docker world.
This is just a quick post, I mainly write for myself, in case it should happen to me again. I temporarily broke my Fedora Silverblue installation for the second time by running the command: sudo rpm-ostree ex livefs --i-like-danger after I installed a new package. One has to append --i-like-danger for a reason, but I didn't want to hear. I wanted to try the new package directly without rebooting my PC.
In this post I want to explain how you can mass-delete old tweets without the need to use a 3rd-party service that probably also want your money or scripts that require you to create an application on the Twitter developer portal. You will just make use of Firefox, Tweetdeck, some shell scripts and two command line tools. To follow this tutorial you need the following prerequisites: An account at Twitter with tweets you want to delete (otherwise this tutorial is totally useless for you) Firefox Basic knowledge of how to use a terminal curl, jq and bash installed on your system (I will use a standard Linux distribution with a zsh-shell, so if you are using Windows or Mac, or another shell, commands can slightly differ) Disclaimer I'm not responsible for any damage caused by you following this tutorial!
One of the most visited pages on my blog is about how to automatically backup Docker volumes. In that post I use the Docker image blacklabelops/volumerize. Unfortunately that image is deprecated since March 2019 and not longer maintained. Under the hood the volumerize image is using the GNU program duplicity, which is an awesome software, but also has its downsides. Especially the model of full backups and incremental backups comes from a time where backups where mainly made to tapes (just append new files all the time).
This blog is a static website hosted on Netlify. As static site builder, I use the awesome Hugo, which is written in Go and amazingly fast. This page with currently more than 300 pages build in less than 500ms. But as the name “static” suggest - just static files that are served by a simple HTTP server - it doesn't have a dynamic backend with the option to schedule posts, so scheduling isn't possible the same way it is with systems like WordPress.
A few weeks ago PostgreSQL 11 was released with a few new features and probably also a lot of improvements and bug fixes since the last release. Although I don't really have the need to update to the latest version (I just use PostgreSQL as database for my Nextcloud and Miniflux installations), I wanted to migrate it though, to have everything up to date and probably profit from those smaller improvements.
Update I changed my setup because the Docker image used in this post got deprecated and is no longer maintained. Read about my new setup using restic to automatically backup Docker volumes. 👉 New setup Original post For my server needs, I rent a small VPS at Hetzner Cloud. It has two vCPUs, 4 GB of RAM, 40 GB of storage and I can use 20 TB of outgoing traffic each month (the incoming traffic is free and unlimited) and it only costs me 5,83€ each month, a lot cheaper than DigitalOcean, Linode or even AWS.
I'm a Solus user (and enthusiast), but as one I also faced a common problem. Not every desktop app is available on Solus Linux and you also can't run .deb or .rpm installation files, because Solus uses a different package manager and isn't based on any other Linux distribution. But my study required me to install an application called “Inform 7”. This software is available for Ubuntu, Debian and also Fedora.
Many people use Google Chrome, because they like it's fancy syncing feature. You know, open a tab on your PC and just continue on your phone. Or because of the nice built-in password manager. Just save that damn password and it's securely stored in your Google account and available everywhere. But what about privacy? You can forget it when you use Chrome. You have no privacy there. Google can read all of your browser history, passwords and bookmarks.
I’m into Kotlin, because it’s a new (quite new) programming language, that solves all the Java problems, especially on Android. You can simply use Lambda expressions and much more on any API version. I also used Kotlin in production in my open sourced newsreader app NewsCatchr. Here I’ll share some of the sources, that helped me getting some knowledge in Kotlin: The documentation The documentation is a really helpful source. I learned Kotlin myself through practice and every time I didn’t understand something I went looking in the docs and they already answered most of my questions, for example how to use any of the many helper functions in the standard library.
Jan-Lukas Else
20 years old student who writes about everything he cares about.