Tutorial

If you want to use Linux applications on Windows you have multiple options. Using the Windows version of the application if it’s available, cross-compile the app, use a VM or Docker, or use the Windows Subsystem for Linux with a X Server. A small and lightweight WSL distro is Alpine, which is also quite popular in the Docker world. It’s based on musl, uses busybox and just contains the most important things to be functional.

Fix Fedora Silverblue after "rpm-ostree ex livefs" failed

This is just a quick post, I mainly write for myself, in case it should happen to me again. I temporarily broke my Fedora Silverblue installation for the second time by running the command: sudo rpm-ostree ex livefs --i-like-danger after I installed a new package. One has to append --i-like-danger for a reason, but I didn’t want to hear. I wanted to try the new package directly without rebooting my PC.
In this post I want to explain how you can mass-delete old tweets without the need to use a 3rd-party service that probably also want your money or scripts that require you to create an application on the Twitter developer portal. You will just make use of Firefox, Tweetdeck, some shell scripts and two command line tools. To follow this tutorial you need the following prerequisites: An account at Twitter with tweets you want to delete (otherwise this tutorial is totally useless for you) Firefox Basic knowledge of how to use a terminal curl, jq and bash installed on your system (I will use a standard Linux distribution with a zsh-shell, so if you are using Windows or Mac, or another shell, commands can slightly differ) Disclaimer I’m not responsible for any damage caused by you following this tutorial!
One of the most visited pages on my blog is about how to automatically backup Docker volumes. In that post I use the Docker image blacklabelops/volumerize. Unfortunately that image is deprecated since March 2019 and not longer maintained. Under the hood the volumerize image is using the GNU program duplicity, which is an awesome software, but also has it’s downsides. Especially the model of full backups and incremental backups comes from a time where backups where mainly made to tapes (just append new files all the time).
This blog is a static website hosted on Netlify. As static site builder, I use the awesome Hugo, which is written in Go and amazingly fast. This page with currently more than 300 pages build in less than 500ms. But as the name “static” suggest - just static files that are served by a simple HTTP server - it doesn’t have a dynamic backend with the option to schedule posts, so scheduling isn’t possible the same way it is with systems like WordPress.